1. #1
    Unregistered Guest

    Can i get system administrator job in any field in Governemnt sector? If yes How Do i Step ahead ?

    I am a networking student. I wish to join as a network administrator in any field in government sector. I am pursuing CCNA Certification also. Can anybody guide me to the job.

  2. #2
    miss professor is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    148

    Re: Can i get system administrator job in any field in Governemnt sector? If yes How Do i Step ahead ?

    hello
    here are some jobs u can apply for if its of your interests.

    Industry Computers / IT
    Education B.E./B.Tech/MCA / BBA/MBA/B.Com/M.Com /MA/BA Any Graduate
    Location Pune
    Experience 0 Years

    Company Profile
    ZS Associates is a global management consulting firm specializing in sales and marketing strategy, operations and execution. ZS is recognized for its expertise in go-to-market and sales force strategies and its downstream implementation capabilities. ZS helps companies achieve sales success by delivering both issue-specific solutions and large-scale business transformations.

    Vacancy Requirements
    Industry: Computers / IT
    Education: B.Tech/B.E
    Location: Guntur, Vijayawada
    Experience: 0 Years

    Job Details
    Fresher - Perform systems administration, both onsite and remote Server tasks, regular meeting with clients and ensure client satisfaction, ensure customer deliverables on time, Server Administration,escalation services to NOC team, upgrade server OS
    www.yuvajobs.com

    Candidate Profile
    B.Tech/B.E

    Company Details
    We at Indmax provision infrastructure services support that are tailor made to suit your need that are consistent with your enterpriseís risk management and control framework, appropriate and cost saving for your organization.

    you can also log onto http://www.yuvajobs.com/search_resul...+Administrator for more info.

  3. #3
    rambahadurkhatri is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    207

    Re: Can i get system administrator job in any field in Governemnt sector? If yes How Do i Step ahead ?

    If youíre looking for a job, consider the Nationís largest employer. Each year, the Federal Government hires thousands of new workers. Hereís how to become one of them.
    People get jobs in the Federal Government in the same way that they get most jobs in the private sector: by finding openings and submitting a resume or application. But searching for a Federal job can be more complicated than other job searches. Thatís because of regulations designed to keep the hiring process fair. Job titles are standardized. Resumes are more detailed. And job qualifications are more specific.
    Tailoring your search to the Federal Governmentís rules will increase your chances of getting a job. Read on to discover the types of jobs available in the Federal civil service and the qualifications required. Then, learn how to find and apply for jobs. Information geared toward students and recent graduates is on page 16. Tips for career changers are on page 19. And page 25 summarizes the Federal job search as a 5-step process.
    Exploring the options and preparing for the hunt
    When hunting for a Federal career, you have a myriad of choices. Federal jobs are spread across more than 100 agencies and bureaus, each with its own mission and each overseeing its own hiring and recruitment. The largest agencies are shown in chart 1.
    Jobs are found throughout the Nation and across the world. As the map shows, about 87 percent of Government jobs are outside of the Washington, DC, area. About 3 percent are in foreign nations.
    Whatís more, the Federal Government hires people for hundreds of occupational specialties, the largest of which are shown in chart 2. For some occupations, including forest conservation technician and geographer, the Federal Government is the primary employer.
    With so many choices, you may need to sort through scores of openings to find a job that fits. Your search will be more fruitful if you understand Federal job titles, identify jobs for which you are qualified, and start with the right resources.
    [Chart 1: Federal agencies with the most employment, March 2004](.pdf file)
    The trouble with titles
    The Federal Government uses a set of standard occupational titles, also called occupational series, to describe its jobs. Some titlesósuch as carpenter and chemistóare easy to understand. Others require interpretation. A person interested in marketing might look for positions with the title market analyst, for example, but he or she also might want positions with the more unusual title of trade analyst. Both involve marketing products.
    [Distribution of Federal workers, March 2004] (.pdf file)
    So, how can you find all the titles that fit your skills? If you are a college graduate, start by scanning the list. It shows how different occupational titles relate to various college majors. If you have a degree in history, for example, titles such as archivist or historian could be a perfect match. But so might other titles, such as writer-editor or foreign affairs specialist, that are mentioned under different liberal arts majors.
    Some of the job titles youíll find are unique to the Federal Government. Program analyst is the most common example. Workers with this title evaluate Government programs, make recommendations for change, and tell decisionmakers what resources programs need. If research, policy analysis, or business is your interest, try this title.
    Jobseekers need to be flexible in their search because titles used by the Federal Government are often broader than private sector ones. One title that people often overlook is technical writer. In the private sector, that title usually refers to jobs writing about science or computers. But in the U.S. Government, technical writing is any writing that requires specialized knowledge. The position could relate to law, education, or any other subject.
    Jobseekers also need flexibility because titles in the Federal Government are often not as current as those in the private sector. Consider Web designer. The Government does not use that name, but it does hire people to do that type of work. Web designing jobs might be listed under visual arts specialist; public relations specialist; or, if the job requires technical computer skills, information technology manager. A good strategy for finding positions is to search for many different titles or by broad occupational group.
    Recognizing the confusion that job titles can cause, the Federal Government provides some help. The Governmentís employment website, www.usajobs.opm.gov, provides definitions for many job titles. The site also offers quizzes that relate career interests to job titles. And for more detailed information about titles, check the U.S. Office of Personnel Managementís Federal Classification and Job Grading Systems, available online at www.opm.gov/fedclass/html/gsclass.asp.
    Qualifications required
    In nearly all cases, Federal employees must be U.S. citizens. Beyond that, qualifications vary.
    Qualifications. The Government hires people with nearly every level of education and experienceófrom high school students with no experience to Ph.D.ís with established careers. Jobs in some occupations, such as engineer, ecologist, and lawyer, require that workers have a bachelorís or graduate degree and credit for specific college classes. Other occupations require experience, education, or a combination of both. A few, such as office clerk, require no education or experience to start.
    The qualifications needed for each job are described in detail in the vacancy announcements that advertise job openings. Each job also has a code that corresponds to its minimum requirements. Understanding these codes will speed your search.
    Shortcut to matching your qualifications: Cracking the GS code. The coding systems used to classify jobs vary by agency, but the most common system is the General Schedule (GS). The GS assigns every job a grade level from 1 to 15, according to the minimum level of education and experience its workers need. Jobs that require no experience or education are graded a GS-1, for example. Jobs that require a bachelorís degree and no experience are graded a GS-5 or GS-7, depending on an applicantís academic credentials and an agencyís policies.
    The table below shows the GS levels for entry-level workers with different amounts of education and little or no work experience.
    GS levels by education
    GS-1No high school diplomaGS-2
    (GS-3 for clerk-steno positions)High school diploma
    GS-3
    1 year of full-time study after high school
    GS-4
    Associate degree or 2 years of full-time study after high school
    GS-5 or GS-7
    depending on agency policy and applicant's academic credentials
    Bachelor's degree or 4 years of full-time study after high school
    GS-7
    Bachelor's degree plus 1 year of full-time graduate study
    GS-9
    (GS-11 for some research positions)
    Master's degree or 2 years of full-time graduate study
    GS-9
    Law degree (J.D. or LL.B.)
    GS-11
    (GS-12 for some research positions)
    Ph.D. or equivalent doctorate or advanced law degree (LL.M.)
    College degrees only qualify you for a particular grade level if they are related to the job. For occupations requiring general college-level skills, a bachelorís degree in any subject can qualify you. But other occupations require a specific major.
    After gaining work experience, people often qualify for higher GS levels. In general, 1 year of experience related to the job could raise your grade by one GS level in most clerical and technician positions. In administrative, professional, and scientific positions, GS level increases in increments of two until you reach a GS-12. After that, GS level increases one level at a time.
    With each additional year of experience at a higher level of responsibility, your GS level could continue to increase until it reaches the maximum for your occupation.
    Resources online and off

  4. #4
    rambahadurkhatri is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    207

    Re: Can i get system administrator job in any field in Governemnt sector? If yes How Do i Step ahead ?

    If youíre looking for a job, consider the Nationís largest employer. Each year, the Federal Government hires thousands of new workers. Hereís how to become one of them.
    People get jobs in the Federal Government in the same way that they get most jobs in the private sector: by finding openings and submitting a resume or application. But searching for a Federal job can be more complicated than other job searches. Thatís because of regulations designed to keep the hiring process fair. Job titles are standardized. Resumes are more detailed. And job qualifications are more specific.
    Tailoring your search to the Federal Governmentís rules will increase your chances of getting a job. Read on to discover the types of jobs available in the Federal civil service and the qualifications required. Then, learn how to find and apply for jobs. Information geared toward students and recent graduates is on page 16. Tips for career changers are on page 19. And page 25 summarizes the Federal job search as a 5-step process.
    Exploring the options and preparing for the hunt
    When hunting for a Federal career, you have a myriad of choices. Federal jobs are spread across more than 100 agencies and bureaus, each with its own mission and each overseeing its own hiring and recruitment. The largest agencies are shown in chart 1.
    Jobs are found throughout the Nation and across the world. As the map shows, about 87 percent of Government jobs are outside of the Washington, DC, area. About 3 percent are in foreign nations.
    Whatís more, the Federal Government hires people for hundreds of occupational specialties, the largest of which are shown in chart 2. For some occupations, including forest conservation technician and geographer, the Federal Government is the primary employer.
    With so many choices, you may need to sort through scores of openings to find a job that fits. Your search will be more fruitful if you understand Federal job titles, identify jobs for which you are qualified, and start with the right resources.
    [Chart 1: Federal agencies with the most employment, March 2004](.pdf file)
    The trouble with titles
    The Federal Government uses a set of standard occupational titles, also called occupational series, to describe its jobs. Some titlesósuch as carpenter and chemistóare easy to understand. Others require interpretation. A person interested in marketing might look for positions with the title market analyst, for example, but he or she also might want positions with the more unusual title of trade analyst. Both involve marketing products.
    [Distribution of Federal workers, March 2004] (.pdf file)
    So, how can you find all the titles that fit your skills? If you are a college graduate, start by scanning the list. It shows how different occupational titles relate to various college majors. If you have a degree in history, for example, titles such as archivist or historian could be a perfect match. But so might other titles, such as writer-editor or foreign affairs specialist, that are mentioned under different liberal arts majors.
    Some of the job titles youíll find are unique to the Federal Government. Program analyst is the most common example. Workers with this title evaluate Government programs, make recommendations for change, and tell decisionmakers what resources programs need. If research, policy analysis, or business is your interest, try this title.
    Jobseekers need to be flexible in their search because titles used by the Federal Government are often broader than private sector ones. One title that people often overlook is technical writer. In the private sector, that title usually refers to jobs writing about science or computers. But in the U.S. Government, technical writing is any writing that requires specialized knowledge. The position could relate to law, education, or any other subject.
    Jobseekers also need flexibility because titles in the Federal Government are often not as current as those in the private sector. Consider Web designer. The Government does not use that name, but it does hire people to do that type of work. Web designing jobs might be listed under visual arts specialist; public relations specialist; or, if the job requires technical computer skills, information technology manager. A good strategy for finding positions is to search for many different titles or by broad occupational group.
    Recognizing the confusion that job titles can cause, the Federal Government provides some help. The Governmentís employment website, www.usajobs.opm.gov, provides definitions for many job titles. The site also offers quizzes that relate career interests to job titles. And for more detailed information about titles, check the U.S. Office of Personnel Managementís Federal Classification and Job Grading Systems, available online at www.opm.gov/fedclass/html/gsclass.asp.
    Qualifications required
    In nearly all cases, Federal employees must be U.S. citizens. Beyond that, qualifications vary.
    Qualifications. The Government hires people with nearly every level of education and experienceófrom high school students with no experience to Ph.D.ís with established careers. Jobs in some occupations, such as engineer, ecologist, and lawyer, require that workers have a bachelorís or graduate degree and credit for specific college classes. Other occupations require experience, education, or a combination of both. A few, such as office clerk, require no education or experience to start.
    The qualifications needed for each job are described in detail in the vacancy announcements that advertise job openings. Each job also has a code that corresponds to its minimum requirements. Understanding these codes will speed your search.
    Shortcut to matching your qualifications: Cracking the GS code. The coding systems used to classify jobs vary by agency, but the most common system is the General Schedule (GS). The GS assigns every job a grade level from 1 to 15, according to the minimum level of education and experience its workers need. Jobs that require no experience or education are graded a GS-1, for example. Jobs that require a bachelorís degree and no experience are graded a GS-5 or GS-7, depending on an applicantís academic credentials and an agencyís policies.
    The table below shows the GS levels for entry-level workers with different amounts of education and little or no work experience.
    GS levels by education
    GS-1No high school diplomaGS-2

    (GS-3 for clerk-steno positions)High school diploma
    GS-3


    1 year of full-time study after high school
    GS-4


    Associate degree or 2 years of full-time study after high school
    GS-5 or GS-7

    depending on agency policy and applicant's academic credentials

    Bachelor's degree or 4 years of full-time study after high school
    GS-7


    Bachelor's degree plus 1 year of full-time graduate study
    GS-9

    (GS-11 for some research positions)

    Master's degree or 2 years of full-time graduate study
    GS-9

    Law degree (J.D. or LL.B.)
    GS-11
    (GS-12 for some research positions)
    Ph.D. or equivalent doctorate or advanced law degree (LL.M.)
    College degrees only qualify you for a particular grade level if they are related to the job. For occupations requiring general college-level skills, a bachelorís degree in any subject can qualify you. But other occupations require a specific major.
    After gaining work experience, people often qualify for higher GS levels. In general, 1 year of experience related to the job could raise your grade by one GS level in most clerical and technician positions. In administrative, professional, and scientific positions, GS level increases in increments of two until you reach a GS-12. After that, GS level increases one level at a time.
    With each additional year of experience at a higher level of responsibility, your GS level could continue to increase until it reaches the maximum for your occupation.
    Resources online and off

  5. #5
    san
    san is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    134

    Re: Can i get system administrator job in any field in Governemnt sector? If yes How Do i Step ahead ?

    serch in google and serch job for your filed you also registerd your resume the nokri. dot .com, times job.com, sarkari nokri dot com

  6. #6
    s.raj is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    96

    Re: Can i get system administrator job in any field in Governemnt sector? If yes How Do i Step ahead ?

    Dear friends, the basic requirement for become a system administrator:-
    1. The candidate must have a technical degree among these, BCA, MCA, PGDCA, BSC.IT, MSC.IT, B.TECH, M.TECH, B.E., etc.

    2. The experience is not neccesary.

    3. The minimum age of candidate should be 18 years.

    4. There are some IT companies, where you can try-
    HCL,
    INFOTECH,
    INFOSYS,
    TECHMAHINDRA,
    Accenture,
    BSNL,
    NTPC,
    ONGC,
    DRDO,
    ISRO,
    WIPRO,
    etc.

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